Kerry Peck Donations Include The National Academy Of Elder Law Attorneys Political Action Committee

For Chicago attorney Kerry Peck, donations are personal. Because he's dedicated his life to helping others, one of the organizations that benefits from Kerry Peck donations is the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys Political Action Committee. This PAC helps support candidates who are dedicated to helping elderly and disabled constituents.

About The National Academy Of Elder Law Attorneys

The National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys helps attorneys find continuing legal education and professional development opportunities. The organization was founded in 1987 and helps lawyers fulfill continuing education and ethics requirements through a number of different live meetings, webinars and virtual meetings. Members have access to a number of free titles in the Online Community that can help them earn required continuing education credits.

Additionally the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys offers a Certified Elder Law Attorney designation. To be certified, attorneys need to go through rigorous education and testing, as well as spend at least 16 hours a week practicing elder law.

Joining The National Academy Of Elder Law Attorneys

Joining the National Academy Of Elder Law Attorneys is easy. The organization is open to attorneys throughout the country who are dedicated to representing the needs of people with disabilities and the elderly. Membership costs $425 a year, but new members do receive a discount for their first year of membership. Full time law students are also eligible for membership at a reduced price.

Additionally, the organization has chapters in 27 states to help local attorneys connect with others and attend local events that relate to their states.

What Kerry Peck Donations Help Accomplish

Kerry Peck donations through the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys Political Action Committee help support candidates such as Representative Steve Israel. Representative Israel sponsored a bill in January 2012 called the Elder Care Tax Credit Act. This act sought to amend the IRS code to provide a tax credit for an adult child who is responsible for caring for his or her parents, even if the parent doesn't live with the adult child. This would help taxpayers bearing the increasing costs of long-term care for their family members. The bill had 10 co-sponsors and was referred to committee, where it remains.

Kerry Peck donations weren't the only donations received by the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys Political Action Committee. The PAC received nearly $65,000 in donations from individuals, mostly dedicated elder law professionals, and the majority of all funds collected went to candidates; less than $3000 went toward operating expenses.

For Kerry Peck, donations aren't just about money. He works with organizations that are dedicated to helping the elderly and the disabled and works tirelessly to ensure that these people are given a voice in the Senate and the House of Representatives, as well as in local governments. It's because of this that the National Academy Of Elder Law Attorneys Political Action Committee is a beneficiary of Kerry Peck donations.

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Estate Planning in a Down Economy: Not Just for the Wealthy

A recent Lawyers.com survey reveals a drop in estate planning for 2009, with only 35% of Americans having a will. Although the down economy is causing everyone to cut corners and cut back, the repercussions of not having an estate plan upon death haven’t changed. No matter what your net worth, just as you are still putting money into your 401K for retirement, it is essential to have a basic estate plan in place to relieve your family of the unnecessary stresses related to end-of-life issues and probate.

Estate Planning Can:

  • Protect assets from creditors;
  • Preserve family wealth for future generations;
  • Put conditions on HOW and WHEN your assets are distributed;
  • Assure that your money and property go to the people YOU intend upon death;
  • Prevent disputes or confusion regarding inheritances;
  • Declare whom you want making medical and financial decisions for you if you are incapacitated; and
  • Reduce estate and gift taxes.

Plan in advance to avoid court battles involving end-of-life decisions or post-death family disputes, which cost much more than the basic estate plan.

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